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DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES OF A BIG TODDLER
(2 - 3 years)

Toptips 24-36 Months
During this period your Infant may:

Physical Development

  • Ride a tricycle.
  • Climb steps, one foot per step.
  • Climb down steps, two steps per step.
  • Walk on tip toes for fun.
  • Throw and kick a ball.
  • Build a 9 cube tower with ease.
  • Enjoy playing with blocks, building bridges.
  • Turn pages of books.
  • Copy circles.
  • Use scissors to snap-snap paper. (Should be supervised)
  • Manage 2 piece puzzles.
  • Thread beads with ease.

Language and Communication

  • Know her name and sex.
  • Talk non-stop.
  • Have a large vocabulary.
  • Manage small threading and finer detail.
  • Understand a whole lot more than she can say.
  • Refer to her things as “Mine”.
  • Recognize sounds in the environment.
  • Asks, “What‘s that?” and “Why?”
  • Name pictures and label everyday items.
  • Want to learn new words.
  • Hears everything!

Emotional and Social Development

  • Show signs of wanting to toilet train. Especially girls.
  • Eat with a fork.
  • Want to be around other children but is still very selfish.
  • Love to give and receive loves and cuddles. Very affectionate.
  • Have temper tantrums, especially when frustrated and tired.
  • Enjoy ordering you around and may like to be the boss!
  • Have mood swings, moving from happy to sad in a matter of minutes.

Warning Signs

  • Uses single words only.
  • Does not follow two instructions e.g. “Go to your bedroom and fetch your shoes.”
  • No interest in toilet training.
  • Does not identify familiar people and objects.
  • Not interested in other people or new situations.
  • Cannot sit and amuse herself for a few minutes at a time.

If, at the end of this period, your child displays any of the above warning signs, please consult a professional for a full assessment.

Please note that these are very generalized concerns. Toptots will not be held responsible for any warning signs not being mentioned here. This list is by no means complete. If you have any concerns whatsoever, it is best that you discuss them with your medical practitioner.

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